TRANSIT TECHNOLOGIES

As VIA plans for the future of transportation, there are a host of transit technologies to consider.  Each option gives passengers a reliable, efficient and comfortable way to reach their destination.  The following transit technologies are options being considered for VIA transit service and may be included in the Long Range Comprehensive Transportation Plan:
Modern Streetcar

Fact Sheet
- Electric powered rail vehicles
- Typical Speed: 8-15 mph in mixed traffic, 45 mph max
- Designed for dense urban areas, such as downtown
- Integrates well with street traffic, signals and pedestrians
- Operates in mixed-traffic with automobiles, and sometimes in a dedicated guideway
- Stimulates economic development throughout the corridor
- Typical passenger capacity: 40 seated + standees (per car)
- Typical length of line: 2 – 6 miles
- aTypical station spacing: 0.25 – .5 miles
- Capital Cost: $20–30 million/mile
- Examples: Portland, OR; Seattle and Tacoma, WA

Light Rail Transit (LRT)

Fact Sheet
- Electric powered vehicles
- Typical Speed: 20-25 mph average, 70 mph max
- Designed for high-capacity corridors
- Integrates well with street traffic, signals and pedestrians
- Operates in a dedicated guideway
- Stimulates economic development throughout the corridor
- Typical passenger capacity: 70 seated + standees (per car)1 – 3 cars
- Typical length of line: 6 – 25 miles
- Typical station spacing: 0.25 – 2 miles
- Capital Cost: $50–$90 million/mile
- Station spacing: 2-5 miles
- Examples: Dallas and Houston, TX; San Diego, CA; ; Charlotte, NC; Minneapolis, MN; Phoenix, AZ

Commuter Rail (CRT)

Fact Sheet
- Diesel or Diesel-electric powered vehicles
- Typical Speed: 65-95 mph
- Designed for long commute applications
- Operates on a dedicated rail easement separate from other vehicles
- Typical passenger capacity: 130 seated (per car)1 - 4 cars
- Typical length of line: 25 – 100 miles
- Typical station spacing: 3–15 miles
- Capital Cost: $10-$30 million/mile
- Examples: Trinity Railway Express (Dallas & Fort Worth, TX); MetroRail Red Line, (Austin, TX); Metrolink, (Southern CA); NCTD Coaster (San Diego, CA); Rail Runner Express (Albuquerque & Santa Fe, NM)

Historic or Replica Streetcar

Fact Sheet
- Electric powered historic style vehicles
- Typical Speed: 8-15 mph in mixed traffic, 25 mph max
- Designed for urban areas, such as downtown
- Integrates well with street traffic, signals and pedestrians
- Operates in mixed-traffic with automobiles, and sometimes in a dedicated guideway
- Stimulates economic development throughout the corridor
- Typical passenger capacity: 30 seated (per car)
- Typical length of line: 2 – 6 miles
- Typical station spacing: 0.25 – .5 miles
- Capital Cost: $15–$30 million/mile
- Spacing between stops: every 2-3 blocks
- Examples: Dallas McKinney Avenue Trolley, TX; New Orleans, LA; Little Rock, AR; San Francisco F Line, CA

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Fact Sheet
- Diesel or Diesel Hybrid articulated buses
- Typical Speed: 20-30 mph, 65 mph max
- Designed for high-capacity corridors
- Integrates well with street traffic, signals and pedestrians
- Operates in a dedicated guideway, and sometimes in mixed-traffic with automobiles
- Typical passenger capacity: 60 seated + standees (per bus)
- Typical length of line: 8 – 15 miles
- Typical station spacing: 0.5 – 1 miles
- Capital Cost: $5–$35 million/mile
- Examples: Los Angeles, CA; Eugene, OR; Las Vegas, NV; Cleveland, OH

High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV)/Managed Lanes

Fact Sheet
- HOV lanes are lanes designed to improve travel speed for transit and carpools, and may be located in freeway medians, shoulders, on arterial streets, or as separate facilities. Operations of existing HOV lanes vary widely, depending on available right-of-way, local policies, and other factors.
- Typical Speed: 55-65 mph
- Designed to increase reliability of highways for carpools and transit
- Capital Cost: $4–$8 million/mile
- Access points every 3 – 5 miles
- Examples: Dallas IH-30, IH-35 & IH-635; Houston IH-10; San Diego IH-15

OVERVIEW
TRANSIT TECHNOLOGIES
GOALS
RESOURCES
THE FINAL PLAN
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